Start Yourself as a Service Business

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Starting a service business gets you a steady stream of cashflow, with minimal investment upfront. Starting a product business, on the other hand, takes tremendous capital -- and of course, there's that inherent risk that no one will buy your products. If that happens, how will you survive with no cash coming into your business? How will you operate with no operating capital?

Don't Repeat Our Mistakes

We started as a product business. It proved we sucked. We used too many resources, used too much time, and demoralized company morale. We spent months writing a product manual before anybody bought the product. We spent time capturing a product logo before anybody cared. Again, we overwhelmingly-unsurprisingly-super-stupidly sucked. With limited resources, we couldn't compete with the big boys of Dell, Apply, HP, and IBM. We had no cashflow, and with no cashflow, it'd kill our company if our products couldn't sell. After letting go half of the company, we took a different approach. Instead of trying to build and sell whitebox computers, we decided to service it.

Cashflow Enables Products

Now with a somewhat stable stream of cash, we're now able to build business products. If those products fail, we'll still have our main business to fall back on: our web computer service business. Think twice about building that new-great-big-billion-dollar invention. You'll probably be better off starting as a service business, then transitioning into a product business. Word.

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Posted on May 14

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